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  1. In part two of this two-part interview, Seth and Brewers prospect RHP Justin Jarvis talk about his professional career as a fifth-round draft pick in 2018 and through his successful 2022 season that spanned two levels of the minors, culminating in AA Biloxi. View full video
  2. In part two of this two-part interview, Seth and Brewers prospect RHP Justin Jarvis talk about his professional career as a fifth-round draft pick in 2018 and through his successful 2022 season that spanned two levels of the minors, culminating in AA Biloxi.
  3. Justin Jarvis was the Brewers fifth-round pick in 2018 out of high school in his home state of North Carolina. He's certainly had his ups and downs in his development, but after a slow start in Wisconsin, something clicked and he finished his season strong, including a promotion to Double-A. In part one, we discuss growing up and developing his baseball talent, being scouted and ultimately getting drafted. Check it out. Image courtesy of Steve Buhr, Twins Daily Justin Jarvis was born in Kannapolis, North Carolina, and in middle school, the family moved about 20 minutes to Mooresville. In high school, he attended Lake Norman High School. Lake Norman is a large lake north of Charlotte. It has tentacles moving in lots of directions which means it has over 500 miles of shoreline. It's also big enough that they have their own version of the Loch Ness Monster that locals call "Normie." But it often provides picturesque views, especially for sunsets. Jarvis focused on baseball. He played a little church league, but "I wasn't any good. I could play defense, but if I got the ball, it was pass, pass, pass." In his younger years, his dream was to become a switch-hitting catcher. Then he got taller, and he had a big arm on his wiry frame. It didn't take him long to realize that his future was on the mound. (You'll also want to hear all about his thoughts on his hitting prowess in the video.) He didn't make the varsity team until his sophomore season. Immediately he started pitching well and impressing the right people. He went to several Perfect Game events and was the #1 right-handed pitcher in North Carolina and the #13 ranked high school righty in the nation. He had committed to UNC-Wilmington, but he knew that he wanted to play pro ball. He was already hitting 92-93 mph and that definitely interested the scouts. In his senior season, he had in-home visits with all 30 teams. It certainly can be a bit overwhelming, but along with a very supportive family, he also got great information and advice from his high school baseball coach, 12-year MLB veteran Ty Wigginton. You may recall, Wigginton had a successful career and played for eight MLB teams over his dozen MLB seasons. "My senior year, my practice was running and playing catch and then I'd feed him balls for infield and outfield." Jarvis later added. "It was awesome. Off-the-field stuff. On-the-field stuff. Even like tax stuff. He's been there and done all that stuff. What you can write off. What you can't write off. My senior year, I didn't even really do the normal practice. He set me up for pro baseball and what it's going to be like." The Brewers had certainly shown strong interest. In fact, his principal excused him from school for a couple of days leading up to the draft because he was flown up to Milwaukee for a workout at American Family Stadium. As the draft approached, the assumption was that he would be selected on Day 2. In fact, his principal allowed him to reschedule a Civics test so that he could go to a Bar & Grill in town to watch the draft with his family, friends, teachers, and teammates. In the fifth round, he heard his name. "I high-fived my dad and then started crying and had to walk out of the room. It was pretty cool!" In Part 2 of our conversation with Justin Jarvis, we will focus on his professional career, his pitches, his development, and much more. Leave your thoughts, comments, questions, congratulations, and well wishes for Jarvis in the COMMENTS below. View full article
  4. Justin Jarvis was born in Kannapolis, North Carolina, and in middle school, the family moved about 20 minutes to Mooresville. In high school, he attended Lake Norman High School. Lake Norman is a large lake north of Charlotte. It has tentacles moving in lots of directions which means it has over 500 miles of shoreline. It's also big enough that they have their own version of the Loch Ness Monster that locals call "Normie." But it often provides picturesque views, especially for sunsets. Jarvis focused on baseball. He played a little church league, but "I wasn't any good. I could play defense, but if I got the ball, it was pass, pass, pass." In his younger years, his dream was to become a switch-hitting catcher. Then he got taller, and he had a big arm on his wiry frame. It didn't take him long to realize that his future was on the mound. (You'll also want to hear all about his thoughts on his hitting prowess in the video.) He didn't make the varsity team until his sophomore season. Immediately he started pitching well and impressing the right people. He went to several Perfect Game events and was the #1 right-handed pitcher in North Carolina and the #13 ranked high school righty in the nation. He had committed to UNC-Wilmington, but he knew that he wanted to play pro ball. He was already hitting 92-93 mph and that definitely interested the scouts. In his senior season, he had in-home visits with all 30 teams. It certainly can be a bit overwhelming, but along with a very supportive family, he also got great information and advice from his high school baseball coach, 12-year MLB veteran Ty Wigginton. You may recall, Wigginton had a successful career and played for eight MLB teams over his dozen MLB seasons. "My senior year, my practice was running and playing catch and then I'd feed him balls for infield and outfield." Jarvis later added. "It was awesome. Off-the-field stuff. On-the-field stuff. Even like tax stuff. He's been there and done all that stuff. What you can write off. What you can't write off. My senior year, I didn't even really do the normal practice. He set me up for pro baseball and what it's going to be like." The Brewers had certainly shown strong interest. In fact, his principal excused him from school for a couple of days leading up to the draft because he was flown up to Milwaukee for a workout at American Family Stadium. As the draft approached, the assumption was that he would be selected on Day 2. In fact, his principal allowed him to reschedule a Civics test so that he could go to a Bar & Grill in town to watch the draft with his family, friends, teachers, and teammates. In the fifth round, he heard his name. "I high-fived my dad and then started crying and had to walk out of the room. It was pretty cool!" In Part 2 of our conversation with Justin Jarvis, we will focus on his professional career, his pitches, his development, and much more. Leave your thoughts, comments, questions, congratulations, and well wishes for Jarvis in the COMMENTS below.
  5. Seth Stohs sits down with Brewers prospect RHP Justin Jarvis, speaking with him about his upbringing, early love of the sport, and his high school years at Lake Norman High School before being drafted by the Brewers in the 2018 MLB Draft. View full video
  6. Seth Stohs sits down with Brewers prospect RHP Justin Jarvis, speaking with him about his upbringing, early love of the sport, and his high school years at Lake Norman High School before being drafted by the Brewers in the 2018 MLB Draft.
  7. In the final part of this three-part series, Seth chats with Brewers left-handed pitching prospect Brandon Knarr about his circuitous path to pro baseball, his development, and his fantastic 2022 season. He began the season with High-A Wisconsin before jumping to Double-A Biloxi. Combined, he went 11-8 with a 2.83 ERA. He had 152 strikeouts and 47 walks over an impressive 146 1/3 innings pitched. We will discuss his background in the game, signing with the Brewers, and his daily routines and preparation for each start. View full video
  8. In the final part of this three-part series, Seth chats with Brewers left-handed pitching prospect Brandon Knarr about his circuitous path to pro baseball, his development, and his fantastic 2022 season. He began the season with High-A Wisconsin before jumping to Double-A Biloxi. Combined, he went 11-8 with a 2.83 ERA. He had 152 strikeouts and 47 walks over an impressive 146 1/3 innings pitched. We will discuss his background in the game, signing with the Brewers, and his daily routines and preparation for each start.
  9. In the second part of this three-part series, Seth chats with Brewers left-handed pitching prospect Brandon Knarr about his circuitous path to pro baseball, his development, and his fantastic 2022 season. He began the season with High-A Wisconsin before jumping to Double-A Biloxi. Combined, he went 11-8 with a 2.83 ERA. He had 152 strikeouts and 47 walks over an impressive 146 1/3 innings pitched. We will discuss his background in the game, signing with the Brewers, and his daily routines and preparation for each start. View full video
  10. In the second part of this three-part series, Seth chats with Brewers left-handed pitching prospect Brandon Knarr about his circuitous path to pro baseball, his development, and his fantastic 2022 season. He began the season with High-A Wisconsin before jumping to Double-A Biloxi. Combined, he went 11-8 with a 2.83 ERA. He had 152 strikeouts and 47 walks over an impressive 146 1/3 innings pitched. We will discuss his background in the game, signing with the Brewers, and his daily routines and preparation for each start.
  11. Left-handed pitcher Brandon Knarr pitched very well in Wisconsin and Biloxi in 2022. Recently, he joined us for a three-part Brewers Spotlight. In Part 1 today, we hear about growing up in Pennsylvania, learning a pitch from a Hall of Famer, his hitting ability, spending a season at Notre Dame and a big year at the College of Central Florida. Image courtesy of Steve Buhr, Twins Daily Brandon Knarr had a strong breakout season in 2022, split between the Wisconsin Timber Rattlers and the Biloxi Shuckers. He’s got a terrific mix of pitches. In fact, he actually learned how to grip one pitch from a Hall of Famer. Growing up in York, Pennsylvania, just about two hours from Philadelphia, a young Brandon Knarr attended Phillies Phestival with his family. The Phillies won a World Series championship during his formative years. It had to be a fun team for a pre-teen baseball fan to follow. At the event, fans had the opportunity to go through lines and take pictures with players. Knarr was walking through the line to get a photo with Roy Halladay. “My dad ushered me along. During the photo ops, you’re not supposed to take a baseball or anything in. They don’t want you to sign anything. So, I’m going up for my photo, and my dad hands me a baseball and says, ‘Hey, ask him how he throws his sinker.’ So I got through the line, and I asked him - I was so nervous - I’ll never forget. He placed my fingers on the ball, exactly how he throws it. The really funny part was that he showed me on my right hand. I was too nervous to tell him I am a lefty.” At Eastern York High School in eastern Pennsylvania, Brandon Knarr played his high school ball in a ballpark with an incredible mountain view and the Susquehanna River in the backdrop. It was a smaller school, but especially Knarr’s sophomore and junior seasons, they were talented enough to compete with the large schools with much bigger talent pools. Knarr was a solid high school hitter, but he is also self-aware enough to know that pitching was where his future was in baseball. “I was a cage all-star.” The southpaw played in several Perfect Game tournaments, Prep Baseball Report events, and other regional and national events. “I was playing all over, up and down the East Coast.” Out of high school, he attended Notre Dame for one season. He then transferred to the College of Central Florida, one of the best junior college baseball programs in the country, under the tutelage of legendary coach Marty Smith. His assistants included his son Ryan Smith (now the Triple-A hitting coach with the Twins) and Zach Bove (now the assistant minor-league pitching coordinator with the Twins). When Bove left midseason to join the Twins, Brett Merritt became the pitching coach. Following the season, he joined the Red Sox organization. “That team and staff and everything there was like the perfect storm to walk into. I feel very fortunate that I was able to go there when I did.” The staff was just starting to use Rapsodo, and digging into training and development methods. All of that was intriguing to Knarr, and he knew that it would be a good place for him to get better. “From whenever we woke up to whenever we went to bed, there were guys at the field doing something. On any random day, you’d find guys in the cage at eight or nine o’clock at night. It was just a really incredible environment.” The team lost their first game of the season and then went on a school-record winning streak that moved them from unranked to #1 in the country. Listen to Part 1 of our Brewers Spotlight with lefty Brandon Knarr. Later in the week, we’ll discuss his 2020 season at a D2 powerhouse, the shortened draft, and deciding to sign with the Brewers in Part 2. And in Part 3, you can hear him discuss his pitches, his preparation for a game, what he does between starts, how he uses available technology and analytics, his offseason goals, and much more. View full article
  12. Brandon Knarr had a strong breakout season in 2022, split between the Wisconsin Timber Rattlers and the Biloxi Shuckers. He’s got a terrific mix of pitches. In fact, he actually learned how to grip one pitch from a Hall of Famer. Growing up in York, Pennsylvania, just about two hours from Philadelphia, a young Brandon Knarr attended Phillies Phestival with his family. The Phillies won a World Series championship during his formative years. It had to be a fun team for a pre-teen baseball fan to follow. At the event, fans had the opportunity to go through lines and take pictures with players. Knarr was walking through the line to get a photo with Roy Halladay. “My dad ushered me along. During the photo ops, you’re not supposed to take a baseball or anything in. They don’t want you to sign anything. So, I’m going up for my photo, and my dad hands me a baseball and says, ‘Hey, ask him how he throws his sinker.’ So I got through the line, and I asked him - I was so nervous - I’ll never forget. He placed my fingers on the ball, exactly how he throws it. The really funny part was that he showed me on my right hand. I was too nervous to tell him I am a lefty.” At Eastern York High School in eastern Pennsylvania, Brandon Knarr played his high school ball in a ballpark with an incredible mountain view and the Susquehanna River in the backdrop. It was a smaller school, but especially Knarr’s sophomore and junior seasons, they were talented enough to compete with the large schools with much bigger talent pools. Knarr was a solid high school hitter, but he is also self-aware enough to know that pitching was where his future was in baseball. “I was a cage all-star.” The southpaw played in several Perfect Game tournaments, Prep Baseball Report events, and other regional and national events. “I was playing all over, up and down the East Coast.” Out of high school, he attended Notre Dame for one season. He then transferred to the College of Central Florida, one of the best junior college baseball programs in the country, under the tutelage of legendary coach Marty Smith. His assistants included his son Ryan Smith (now the Triple-A hitting coach with the Twins) and Zach Bove (now the assistant minor-league pitching coordinator with the Twins). When Bove left midseason to join the Twins, Brett Merritt became the pitching coach. Following the season, he joined the Red Sox organization. “That team and staff and everything there was like the perfect storm to walk into. I feel very fortunate that I was able to go there when I did.” The staff was just starting to use Rapsodo, and digging into training and development methods. All of that was intriguing to Knarr, and he knew that it would be a good place for him to get better. “From whenever we woke up to whenever we went to bed, there were guys at the field doing something. On any random day, you’d find guys in the cage at eight or nine o’clock at night. It was just a really incredible environment.” The team lost their first game of the season and then went on a school-record winning streak that moved them from unranked to #1 in the country. Listen to Part 1 of our Brewers Spotlight with lefty Brandon Knarr. Later in the week, we’ll discuss his 2020 season at a D2 powerhouse, the shortened draft, and deciding to sign with the Brewers in Part 2. And in Part 3, you can hear him discuss his pitches, his preparation for a game, what he does between starts, how he uses available technology and analytics, his offseason goals, and much more.
  13. In the first part of this three-part series, Seth chats with Brewers left-handed pitching prospect Brandon Knarr about his circuitous path to pro baseball, his development, and his fantastic 2022 season. He began the season with High-A Wisconsin before jumping to Double-A Biloxi. Combined, he went 11-8 with a 2.83 ERA. He had 152 strikeouts and 47 walks over an impressive 146 1/3 innings pitched. We will discuss his background in the game, signing with the Brewers, and his daily routines and preparation for each start. View full video
  14. In the first part of this three-part series, Seth chats with Brewers left-handed pitching prospect Brandon Knarr about his circuitous path to pro baseball, his development, and his fantastic 2022 season. He began the season with High-A Wisconsin before jumping to Double-A Biloxi. Combined, he went 11-8 with a 2.83 ERA. He had 152 strikeouts and 47 walks over an impressive 146 1/3 innings pitched. We will discuss his background in the game, signing with the Brewers, and his daily routines and preparation for each start.
  15. Seth sits down with the Brewers' 2022 first round draft pick, shortstop Eric Brown, Jr. In the first segment of this interview, they talk about Brown's childhood and growing up with the game. View full video
  16. In Part 2 of our conversation with Milwaukee Brewers first-round pick, shortstop Eric Brown, Jr., we discussed his time at Coastal Carolina, his development, the draft, and the beginning of his professional career in the Brewers organization. Image courtesy of Neal Hock, Carolina Mudcats If you missed Part 1 of our Brewers Spotlight interview with Eric Brown, Jr., click here. When we ended Part 1, Brown had just gone to a world wood bat tournament and played so well that he came out of it with 17 college offers. Coastal Carolina made it clear that they wanted him. In fact, as soon as Brown’s team was out of the tournament, the Brown family drove the five hours from Georgia straight to the campus in Conway, South Carolina. It was already about 9:00 pm, and the baseball coach showed them all around campus, right up until about 1:00 am. Dallas Baptist was another school that Brown strongly considered, and with his family’s religious beliefs and faith it was another very good option for him. In addition, Dallas was just three hours from the Brown’s home. Ultimately, Coastal Carolina was the choice for Brown. He hit just .259 as a freshman, “but it was a struggle to hit .259.” He considers the lost Covid season a “blessing in disguise” and took advantage of it. Brown said, “I truly do feel that for me personally, it was. This is God showing me, you can get your feet wet right here, I’m going to show you what you need to work on for next year. You can get your feet wet and you come in next year and you’re ready to go.” Specifically, he worked on his mental approach to the game and felt that was very important for him to develop. But he also learned from the games he did play, and what he needed to work on, and he set out to improve. He also put on 22 pounds between his freshman and his sophomore year as well. In 50 games as a sophomore in 2021, he hit .294/.413/.513 (.926) with 12 doubles, a triple, and nine home runs. He spent that summer playing for Cotuit in the Cape Cod League. As a junior in 2022, he was even better. Brown played in 57 games and hit .330/.460/.544 (1.004) with 10 doubles, two triples, and seven home runs. Going into the 2022 draft, rankings and draft boards had Brown going anywhere from the middle of the first round to the middle of the second round, so they just weren’t sure what was going to happen. Brown’s father has always been a huge Yankees fan. So when his son’s phone rang at the Number 24 pick, Eric Sr. got nervous and said, “Oh no!” The Boston Red Sox had that 24th pick. But I’m sure Mr. Brown was quite happy when the Sox didn’t take his son. The Yankees had the 25th pick, but they selected Vanderbilt outfielder Spencer Jones. The White Sox took a high school pitcher at #26. With the 27th overall pick in the 2022 MLB Draft, the Milwaukee Brewers selected Eric Brown, Jr. “The night that I got drafted… I don’t remember that night. Honestly, I don’t. I got my name called and the rest of the night was a blur. I was on the phone left and right. I didn’t know if I was too happy. I was crying. I can’t believe this just happened. It was crazy!” Later that week, he had the opportunity to go to Milwaukee where he signed. He met a lot of players including “one of my idols, Christian Yelich.” Brown added, “Our swings are somewhat similar from our lower half. If he can do it, I can do it. He was my motivation. It was pretty awesome meeting him.” From Milwaukee, he flew to Arizona and played four Arizona Complex League games before jumping up to Low-A Carolina where he finished with the Carolina Mudcats. Brown notes that he sees himself currently as a four-tool player. One of the things that he is specifically working on this offseason is his speed. Yes, he can get quicker, but if base stealing is any sort of measure of speed (it can be, but so are instincts), stealing 19 bases in 21 attempts in his pro debut is a pretty exciting sign of things to come. He has hit for average. He is strong and could turn all those doubles into homers over time. He is a solid defensive shortstop, but he also spent a lot of time in high school at the hot corner, and he’s got the strong arm to prove it. Some say there is a sixth ‘tool,’ plate discipline. In his college career, he walked more than he struck out. Eric Brown, Jr., is a very exciting prospect for the Brewers. There are a lot of reasons to be encouraged about his future with the Brewers organization. It will be interesting to see how quickly he is able to work his way up the organization. Join me in congratulating Brown on being drafted, and thanking him for taking the time to answer our questions. And if you have more questions for Brown, include them in the Comments below. Either I will try to ask him, or maybe he’ll log in and answer himself. View full article
  17. Seth sits down with the Brewers' 2022 first round draft pick, shortstop Eric Brown, Jr. In the second and final segment of this interview, the two talk about Brown's collegiate years, being drafted in the first round, and his introduction to the Milwaukee Brewers organization. View full video
  18. Seth sits down with the Brewers' 2022 first round draft pick, shortstop Eric Brown, Jr. In the second and final segment of this interview, the two talk about Brown's collegiate years, being drafted in the first round, and his introduction to the Milwaukee Brewers organization.
  19. If you missed Part 1 of our Brewers Spotlight interview with Eric Brown, Jr., click here. When we ended Part 1, Brown had just gone to a world wood bat tournament and played so well that he came out of it with 17 college offers. Coastal Carolina made it clear that they wanted him. In fact, as soon as Brown’s team was out of the tournament, the Brown family drove the five hours from Georgia straight to the campus in Conway, South Carolina. It was already about 9:00 pm, and the baseball coach showed them all around campus, right up until about 1:00 am. Dallas Baptist was another school that Brown strongly considered, and with his family’s religious beliefs and faith it was another very good option for him. In addition, Dallas was just three hours from the Brown’s home. Ultimately, Coastal Carolina was the choice for Brown. He hit just .259 as a freshman, “but it was a struggle to hit .259.” He considers the lost Covid season a “blessing in disguise” and took advantage of it. Brown said, “I truly do feel that for me personally, it was. This is God showing me, you can get your feet wet right here, I’m going to show you what you need to work on for next year. You can get your feet wet and you come in next year and you’re ready to go.” Specifically, he worked on his mental approach to the game and felt that was very important for him to develop. But he also learned from the games he did play, and what he needed to work on, and he set out to improve. He also put on 22 pounds between his freshman and his sophomore year as well. In 50 games as a sophomore in 2021, he hit .294/.413/.513 (.926) with 12 doubles, a triple, and nine home runs. He spent that summer playing for Cotuit in the Cape Cod League. As a junior in 2022, he was even better. Brown played in 57 games and hit .330/.460/.544 (1.004) with 10 doubles, two triples, and seven home runs. Going into the 2022 draft, rankings and draft boards had Brown going anywhere from the middle of the first round to the middle of the second round, so they just weren’t sure what was going to happen. Brown’s father has always been a huge Yankees fan. So when his son’s phone rang at the Number 24 pick, Eric Sr. got nervous and said, “Oh no!” The Boston Red Sox had that 24th pick. But I’m sure Mr. Brown was quite happy when the Sox didn’t take his son. The Yankees had the 25th pick, but they selected Vanderbilt outfielder Spencer Jones. The White Sox took a high school pitcher at #26. With the 27th overall pick in the 2022 MLB Draft, the Milwaukee Brewers selected Eric Brown, Jr. “The night that I got drafted… I don’t remember that night. Honestly, I don’t. I got my name called and the rest of the night was a blur. I was on the phone left and right. I didn’t know if I was too happy. I was crying. I can’t believe this just happened. It was crazy!” Later that week, he had the opportunity to go to Milwaukee where he signed. He met a lot of players including “one of my idols, Christian Yelich.” Brown added, “Our swings are somewhat similar from our lower half. If he can do it, I can do it. He was my motivation. It was pretty awesome meeting him.” From Milwaukee, he flew to Arizona and played four Arizona Complex League games before jumping up to Low-A Carolina where he finished with the Carolina Mudcats. Brown notes that he sees himself currently as a four-tool player. One of the things that he is specifically working on this offseason is his speed. Yes, he can get quicker, but if base stealing is any sort of measure of speed (it can be, but so are instincts), stealing 19 bases in 21 attempts in his pro debut is a pretty exciting sign of things to come. He has hit for average. He is strong and could turn all those doubles into homers over time. He is a solid defensive shortstop, but he also spent a lot of time in high school at the hot corner, and he’s got the strong arm to prove it. Some say there is a sixth ‘tool,’ plate discipline. In his college career, he walked more than he struck out. Eric Brown, Jr., is a very exciting prospect for the Brewers. There are a lot of reasons to be encouraged about his future with the Brewers organization. It will be interesting to see how quickly he is able to work his way up the organization. Join me in congratulating Brown on being drafted, and thanking him for taking the time to answer our questions. And if you have more questions for Brown, include them in the Comments below. Either I will try to ask him, or maybe he’ll log in and answer himself.
  20. Seth sits down with the Brewers' 2022 first round draft pick, shortstop Eric Brown, Jr. In the first segment of this interview, they talk about Brown's childhood and growing up with the game.
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