Jump to content
Brewer Fanatic
  • George Scott, the Brewers First 35 Home Run Hitter


    Matt Breen

    Five Gold Gloves. In a row. Let's add in 115 taters during that span. Plus we can tack on one of the best nicknames in team history. That can only mean this week’s throwback is about former Brewer slugger George 'Boomer' Scott.

    Image courtesy of Brewer Fanatic

    Brewers Video

     

     

    George Scott Jr. was born in Mississippi in 1944. His father died when he was only two years old, and George Jr. picked cotton to help the family at age nine. Scott excelled at athletics as a teen and signed with the Boston Red Sox out of high school in 1962.

    Initially, Scott worked all over the diamond but eventually settled at 3B as his primary position. Position aside, Scott quickly demonstrated the ability to hit - both for power and average. 

    Scott reached the majors in 1966, shifting to 1B a week into the season. He made the all-star team and finished 3rd in the Rookie of the Year voting while hitting 27 HR. Scott's first stint (six years) in Boston was inconsistent. He won two Gold Gloves and hit .303 in his second season but also hit an abysmal .171 in his third year. 

    After the 1971 season, the Red Sox decided to shake up their club, dealing Scott, Jim Lonborg, Joe Lahoud, Billy Conigliaro, Ken Brett, and Don Pavletich to the Brewers for Tommy Harper, Marty Pattin, Lew Krausse and a minor leaguer. 

    The move was a boon for Scott. He spent the next five seasons in Milwaukee, winning a Gold Glove each year and making the all-star team in 1975 - a season where he led the majors with 36 HR and 109 RBI. 

    During his time in Milwaukee, the big first baseman averaged 23 HR and 89 RBI a year to go with a .283 BA and a .798 OPS. 

    With Milwaukee continuing to struggle in the standings, Scott asked to be traded after the 1976 season. The Brewers obliged, sending him back to Boston (along with Bernie Carbo) for Cecil Cooper.

    Scott had one more good season in 1977, slugging 33 HR. After that, he struggled through two more years, bouncing between three clubs. At age 36, he went to the Mexican League, where he played (as well as managed) for five more years. He stayed in baseball as a manager in independent and college ball, finishing up in 2002 in the Northern League.

    After retiring, Scott moved to Greenville, Mississippi. He died in July 2013 at the age of 69.

    While Scott is most associated with the Red Sox, he was a vital member of the early years of the Brewers, providing power and outstanding defense during his five years in Milwaukee. He hit 115 of his 271 HR while with the Brewers and won five of his eight Gold Gloves. For his career, he had 1,992 hits. His 22.4 bWAR ranks seventh amongst hitters in franchise history.

    While the trade back to Boston disappointed many, it brought back one of the franchise's best players - Cecil Cooper - a trade that helped establish Milwaukee as a powerhouse team in the late 1970s and 1980s.

    Scott, nicknamed 'Boomer' due to the massive home runs he hit, was an athletic man despite fighting weight problems much of his life. He was also known for his oversized personality and is often credited with popularizing the term 'taters' as another name for a home run. 

    Please share your memories of the former Brewer slugger George 'Boomer' Scott.

    Think you could write a story like this? Brewer Fanatic wants you to develop your voice, find an audience, and we'll pay you to do it. Just fill out this form.

    MORE FROM BREWER FANATIC
    — Latest Brewers coverage from our writers
    — Recent Brewers discussion in our forums
    — Follow Brewer Fanatic via Twitter, Facebook or email

     Share


    User Feedback

    Recommended Comments

    Featured Comments

    Um. . . Tommy Harper is the Brewers' first 30 HR hitter, hitting 31 in the first year of the Brewers' existence.

    This is embarrassing; you even referenced Tommy Harper in the article.

     

    • Like 1
    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    The teenaged me was pretty excited about that trade with Boston. Funny thing, the Brewers were looking at Scott to fill a hole.....at third base. Johnny Briggs was penciled in at first, and I recall early in the '72 season they would make a defensive change to protect late leads--Scott would move to first with Briggs going to the OF & Mike Ferraro taking over at third. Eventually he settled in at 1B fulltime, by far his best position.

    Scott hit one of the longest HRs I ever saw in person, on a Sunday vs the Yankees. Sam McDowell was near the end of his career, & Scott took him deep w/the bases loaded, maybe a couple rows from hitting the back wall at the top of the LF bleachers. Fun times.

    He also wore the necklace (you can clearly see it in the photo above). He used to say it was made out of "second basemens' teeth".

    • Like 1
    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    1 hour ago, Jim French Stepstool said:

    The teenaged me was pretty excited about that trade with Boston. Funny thing, the Brewers were looking at Scott to fill a hole.....at third base. Johnny Briggs was penciled in at first, and I recall early in the '72 season they would make a defensive change to protect late leads--Scott would move to first with Briggs going to the OF & Mike Ferraro taking over at third. Eventually he settled in at 1B fulltime, by far his best position.

    Scott hit one of the longest HRs I ever saw in person, on a Sunday vs the Yankees. Sam McDowell was near the end of his career, & Scott took him deep w/the bases loaded, maybe a couple rows from hitting the back wall at the top of the LF bleachers. Fun times.

    He also wore the necklace (you can clearly see it in the photo above). He used to say it was made out of "second basemens' teeth".

    I didn't remember John Briggs playing 1B; Scott did start 20 games at 3B for the Brewers in 1972.

    What I remember is he wore a (batting?) helmet in the field.

    • Like 1
    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    On 10/8/2022 at 2:08 PM, Robocaller said:

    Um. . . Tommy Harper is the Brewers' first 30 HR hitter, hitting 31 in the first year of the Brewers' existence.

    This is embarrassing; you even referenced Tommy Harper in the article.

     

    The title of the article was a simple mistake. They can happen. 

    Link to comment
    Share on other sites



    Join the conversation

    You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
    Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

    Guest
    Add a comment...

    ×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

      Only 75 emoji are allowed.

    ×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

    ×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

    ×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...