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  • Brewers' Outfield Has Questions, May Require Moves in Free Agency


    Tim Muma

    The Milwaukee Brewers have already had a busy offseason, and more moves are coming. While they could roll into Opening Day with the current position players, the outfield has questions and is far from settled. Fortunately, there's plenty of time to improve and solidify this part of the roster.

    Image courtesy of © Orlando Ramirez-USA TODAY Sports

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    There's an exciting mix of players for the Milwaukee Brewers to choose a core outfield but they need to create the right combination of offensive production and defensive reliability. Part of that stems from the possible reliance on more than one rookie regularly in the upcoming season. So while the Brewers have internal decisions to make, they also should be looking to add one more outfield alternative from outside the organization.

    When GM Matt Arnold traded right fielder Hunter Renfroe to the Anaheim Angels, it left a giant hole in the lineup. Arnold replaced that divot with Jesse Winker in a swap with the Seattle Mariners, but that wasn't an equal replacement as Winker bats from the left side and is a sizable dropoff defensively. It's likely Winker occupies the designated hitter spot most nights against right-handed pitchers, but that still leaves right field open and a lineup slot versus lefties. Here's a look at the group Milwaukee could choose from internally to be on the 26-man roster:

    • Christian Yelich (L)
      • Leadoff hitter with quality on-base skills and hard contact (.355 OBP, 111 OPS+ in 2022)
      • Average-to-below-average defensive skills but has one of the weakest arms in the outfield
    • Jesse Winker (L)
      • Among the worst defenders last season with a bad arm and -16 defensive runs saved (last among outfielders with 200 innings played)
      • MVP-level offense against right-handed pitching in his career (.388 OBP, .885 OPS) but struggles vs. lefties
    • Tyrone Taylor (R)
      • Quality outfielder who can play all three positions and provides decent power (.448 SLG past two seasons)
      • Best suited as a fourth outfielder playing a few times a week due to poor plate discipline (102 K, 22 BB in 2022)
    • Garrett Mitchell (L)
      • Played only 28 MLB games last season, with up-and-down results
      • Showed off speed and defensive ability in center field and posted an .832 OPS, but he looked overmatched at times and averaged one strikeout per game
    • Sal Frelick (L)
      • Brewers' number two prospect with plate discipline (.403 OBP in minors in 2022), highly-rated hit tool, and top speed
      • Questions about him in center field and little in-game power
    • Joey Wiemer (R)
      • Brewers' number three prospect with a power bat (21 HR, 34 doubles in minors last season), strong arm, and sneaky speed
      • High strikeout guy with few walks and average defense

    Each five-man option has its concerns and apparent warts. Yelich, Winker, and Taylor are locks on the 26-man roster if they're with the organization. That leaves only three rookies to choose from (Mitchell still has rookie status) for the remaining two slots. Having two rookies on the big league roster as outfielders are problematic for two reasons:

    1) It's difficult to rely on their bats for consistent production in the lineup (and possibly three rookies with infielder Brice Turang).
    2) If one of them is not playing much, their development is stunted, and they would be better off getting regular at-bats in the minor leagues.

    But let's say the Brewers roll the dice and decide the best route. Which two guys fortify the team better? Mitchell and Frelick are left-handed and profile as speed and contact guys overpower. If you keep both of them, you have four left-handed hitting outfielders with only Taylor as a right-handed stick. Not ideal since the Brewers should limit Winker's appearances against southpaws. So could Wiemer, a power bat pegged for a corner spot, pair with one of the lefty center fielders? Wiemer's hit tool is the question, and if he struggles, will he get the at-bats he needs to figure out MLB pitching?

    In either scenario, but especially if Milwaukee kept the two lefty bats, Taylor would see a lot more action in 2023. The more at-bats Taylor receives, the more he scuffles. Taylor's best output comes in limited action against carefully selected pitchers. For example, in 2021, he had 271 plate appearances and posted a .247/.321/.457 slash line. In 2022, with 405 plate appearances, those numbers dipped to .233/.286/.442.

    All this leads to exploring the Brewers' options outside of the club. There are still a few viable free agents and possible trade targets. Assuming Milwaukee isn't getting a top-tier hitter, the new acquisition should hit right-handed to provide additional coverage versus lefty pitching.

    Trade Candidates

    Anthony Santander (Baltimore Orioles): Santander blasted 33 HR last season for a 117 OPS+. The switch-hitter was on the trade block at last year's deadline before hitting 14 homers in the final two months. He's been a solid right fielder in his career, as well. Baltimore has up-and-coming outfielders and needs pitching badly. Could Adrian Houser and a minor-league arm be enough?

    Ramón Laureano (Oakland A's): The Brewers were mentioned as a destination for Laureano at the trade deadline, and Oakland is dumping veterans left and right. He had a rough 2022 but owned a career .324 OBP and .444 SLG while playing half his games in a vast pitcher's park. With a 111 OPS+ in 2021, his bat could reawaken in Milwaukee, and he brings plus defense to right field, as well. You would think Oakland would be happy with a couple of prospects.

    Free Agents

    Wil Myers: He has had only one season with an OPS+ below 108 since 2015. Myers' playing time was severely limited in 2022, and he could be drawn to more opportunity in Milwaukee, where he could easily pop 20 home runs playing half his games in American Family Field instead of cavernous Petco Park. His right field defense is inconsistent but not terrible, and he could help with coverage at first base.

    AJ Pollock: He took a step back last season but had a tremendous 134 OPS+ in 2021. You wouldn't expect that in 2023 at age 35, but he can still provide value at the plate and in the field. As a bonus, Pollock crushes left-handers, including a .619 slugging percentage and .935 OPS last season. He lost a step as a center fielder but would also play well in right with a strong arm.

    Adding one of these for players gives the lineup more punch and reliability from the outfield, especially against lefties. It would also allow one of the rookies to start regularly with the Brewers while the other two continue to hone their skills on the farm. It's also possible that the Brewers trade Taylor or one of the youngsters is traded for another significant piece, but that's for another article. Who would your five-man outfield group be for Opening Day 2023?

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    It would be cool if they just went forward with the guys they have now. Maybe option one of Wiemer or Frelick to the minors. Kind of like when they decided to just keep Burnes, Woodruff, and Peralta in 18/19. I understand why they wouldn't though, because that's a bigger risk. They will probably at least grab a right fielder

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    12 hours ago, DoubleSwitch said:

    It would be cool if they just went forward with the guys they have now. Maybe option one of Wiemer or Frelick to the minors. Kind of like when they decided to just keep Burnes, Woodruff, and Peralta in 18/19. I understand why they wouldn't though, because that's a bigger risk. They will probably at least grab a right fielder

    I think the article brings up a very valid point that while it's fine to rotate 2-3 rookies through a single position until you find what sticks, it's really dangerous to do that with the same 2-3 rookies over two positions. The offensive downside could be disastrous if both decide to be, you know, rookies and post .550 OPSes for two months.

    That's the kind of thing that could sink a season where the Brewers are already at a disadvantage to the Cardinals. Get off to a bad start in April and May and it may not be possible to recover.

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    Play the rookies.  Taylor is more than a capable backup but start the rookies who have a much higher ceiling.  The Brewers likely have all of their outfielders on the team already.  Winker, Yelich, Mitchell, Frelick, and Taylor should be it maybe some triple A veteran depth but with the substantial cost of the starting pitching, shortstop and leftfield positions I would think there will be any more done.  Last year, Cleveland was more than a formidable team starting a plethora of rookies.  Every major leaguer was a rookie at one time, so I don't understand this articles argument that rookies are bad because they are unknown.  

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    9 minutes ago, Hacksaw Jim Duggan said:

    Play the rookies.  Taylor is more than a capable backup but start the rookies who have a much higher ceiling.  The Brewers likely have all of their outfielders on the team already.  Winker, Yelich, Mitchell, Frelick, and Taylor should be it maybe some triple A veteran depth but with the substantial cost of the starting pitching, shortstop and leftfield positions I would think there will be any more done.  Last year, Cleveland was more than a formidable team starting a plethora of rookies.  Every major leaguer was a rookie at one time, so I don't understand this articles argument that rookies are bad because they are unknown.  

    I don't know. Last offseason and early in the season, I heard the likes of Longenhagen and maybe Law (not sure if it was Keith or someone else like Szymborski) really talking up the upper levels of the Cleveland farm and how they were going to get scary-good, scary-fast. There were rumblings that most of baseball was sleeping on Cleveland's organization a bit.

    While I really like Milwaukee's hitting prospects, I haven't heard similar rumblings about them. Naturally, that doesn't mean the Brewers can't burst out with a bunch of rookies, that's always possible, but it's a dangerous way to build an Opening Day roster.

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    Tim Muma
  • Brewer Fanatic Contributor
  • Posted

    I'm all for giving young guys a shot, but like @Brock Beauchampnoted, there is enormous risk to the team's success to go rookie heavy. If you think the Brewers can be contenders with their pitching, you can't plan to rely on 2-3 rookies regularly in your lineup unless they are all can't miss, top 25 in baseball hitters. You will be lucky to win 83 games if ALL goes right.

    For me?  I would start Freick in CF and us Turang as a super utility guy getting maybe 2-3 starts a week. Have Mitchell & Wiemer ready to go in AAA in case of injury or ineffectiveness. Too often, people just think the 26 guys who start in the big leagues will just play the whole season. Bring in a veteran outfielder to keep depth ready to perform. If you have all your top guys up & you need to go to the minors later, now there is a big dropoff.

     

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    I don't recall any of the pundits talking about the virtues of a Corbin Burnes, Brandon Woodruff, or Willy Adames.  I am sure they all down-graded Peralta on his size and lack of fastball velocity.  I don't give much thought to a Law as he has been misevaluating prospects for over 20 years now.  He has missed on a number of top 10 prospects, and he is always biased to the big teams.  Most of the pundits tend to overlook small market talents all the time.  There is a reason none of the so-called prospect evaluators are not employed by teams but by the media.  I would be careful about basing my evaluation of the Brewers triple A talent based on their assumptions.  The rookies combined defense alone will be better than last year.  All can run not many balls will be touching the ground given the quality of the Brewers starting pitching.  At this point, the Brewers priority should be on the relievers market.

     

     

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    40 minutes ago, DHonks said:

    Winker is going to have a hard time being a frequent DH when it’s likely occupied by Yelich 2-3 times per week and Hiura the rest

    Except I don't think that is going to happen.

    I think Yelich will still be our full time LF, and might DH 1 or 2 times per week max.  

    I think Hiura is a goner, via trade.  Doubt we get much in return, but I think they are going to send him packing.

    I think Winker was acquired as our normal DH, since he is a liability in the field.  He may get occasional starts in the OF, but no way is that going to be a daily thing.

    As much as I want Hiura to be in the mix, if the plan is to use him like we did last year, there is no point in keeping him around.  Trade him to a team that can afford to play him.

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    Tim Muma
  • Brewer Fanatic Contributor
  • Posted

    Each person is completely entitled to their opinions and we can't prove that anyone is wrong or right here because we can't play out the season in different ways. So for the "let all the kids play" crowd, you are comfortable with the following lineup, when you're in a competitive window with one of the best rotations in baseball?

    1 - Yelich LF
    2 - Adames SS
    3 - Winker DH
    4 - Contreras C
    5 - Tellez 1B
    6 - Urias 3B/2B
    7 - Frelick RF
    8 - Mitchell CF
    9 - Turang 2B/3B

    And against LHP? Frelick, Mitchell, Turang, Yelich, Winker, Tellez all LH.  Taylor, Brosseau the only 2 right-handed options. Toro a switch-hitter.  I don't know. Looks like less than 4 runs per game to me. And with an injury or two, big dropoff. I just think you need to trickle in the youngsters, like they did with Weeks, Hardy, Braun, Fielder, and Hart.

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    56 minutes ago, Hacksaw Jim Duggan said:

    I don't recall any of the pundits talking about the virtues of a Corbin Burnes, Brandon Woodruff, or Willy Adames.  I am sure they all down-graded Peralta on his size and lack of fastball velocity.  I don't give much thought to a Law as he has been misevaluating prospects for over 20 years now.  He has missed on a number of top 10 prospects, and he is always biased to the big teams.  Most of the pundits tend to overlook small market talents all the time.  There is a reason none of the so-called prospect evaluators are not employed by teams but by the media.  I would be careful about basing my evaluation of the Brewers triple A talent based on their assumptions.  The rookies combined defense alone will be better than last year.  All can run not many balls will be touching the ground given the quality of the Brewers starting pitching.  At this point, the Brewers priority should be on the relievers market.

    Evaluators are often wrong but they're still more well-informed about prospects in the broadest sense of the term (as in all 30 teams) and they have no personal incentive to fudge the numbers one direction over the other (well, the good analysts, anyway).

    As for Law, he's one of the better analysts out there. I'd put his track record against almost anyone. He's overly opinionated and a bit of a jerk at times but he's also good at his job. When he speaks, I tend to listen because there's useful information in there.

    And anyway, I clearly said it was possible for the Brewers' rookies to all burst onto the scene but it's also unlikely and a pretty bad Plan A going into the season, in my opinion. That kind of decision is operating without a safety net.

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    1 hour ago, Tim Muma said:

    I'm all for giving young guys a shot, but like @Brock Beauchampnoted, there is enormous risk to the team's success to go rookie heavy. If you think the Brewers can be contenders with their pitching, you can't plan to rely on 2-3 rookies regularly in your lineup unless they are all can't miss, top 25 in baseball hitters. You will be lucky to win 83 games if ALL goes right.

    For me?  I would start Freick in CF and us Turang as a super utility guy getting maybe 2-3 starts a week. Have Mitchell & Wiemer ready to go in AAA in case of injury or ineffectiveness. Too often, people just think the 26 guys who start in the big leagues will just play the whole season. Bring in a veteran outfielder to keep depth ready to perform. If you have all your top guys up & you need to go to the minors later, now there is a big dropoff.

     

    So when would Mitchell and Wiemer get to the big leagues if Frelick does well? Next year you wouldn't want to start a rookie in RF because the CF only had a year's experience and Turang might be starting somewhere. The following year you probably have Chuirio in the mix too. I believe they could easily start 2 rookies in the OF becasue they have Taylor as a safety net. If they both fail, there is always outfielders available plus one of the three will still be in AAA.

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    13 minutes ago, wntrtxn21 said:

    So when would Mitchell and Wiemer get to the big leagues if Frelick does well? Next year you wouldn't want to start a rookie in RF because the CF only had a year's experience and Turang might be starting somewhere. The following year you probably have Chuirio in the mix too. I believe they could easily start 2 rookies in the OF becasue they have Taylor as a safety net. If they both fail, there is always outfielders available plus one of the three will still be in AAA.

    If you go into the season expecting one rookie to start, you're almost guaranteed to have two rookies starting by the first of May. These guys will get their shots.

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    52 minutes ago, Tim Muma said:

    1 - Yelich LF (119 wRC+)
    2 - Adames SS (111 wRC+)
    3 - Winker DH (122 wRC+)
    4 - Contreras C (115 wRC+)
    5 - Tellez 1B (123 wRC+)
    6 - Urias 3B/2B (110 wRC+)
    7 - Frelick RF (111 wRC+)
    8 - Mitchell CF (99 wRC+)
    9 - Turang 2B/3B (94 wRC+)

    I added the Steamer projected wRC+ for 2023, that looks like more than four runs per game to me.

    Last year the Brewers 4.48 R/G ranked 10th vs a league average of 4.28 R/G. Only seven teams - KCR (3.95), LAA (3.85), WAS (3.72), PIT (3.65), MIA (3.62), OAK (3.51) and DET (3.44) came in under four runs per game.

    I still think there is room to add one more lefty masher to the Corner/DH mix to round things out and trust Arnie to add one before spring training rolls around.

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    4 minutes ago, sveumrules said:

    I added the Steamer projected wRC+ for 2023, that looks like more than four runs per game to me.

    Last year the Brewers 4.48 R/G ranked 10th vs a league average of 4.28 R/G. Only seven teams - KCR (3.95), LAA (3.85), WAS (3.72), PIT (3.65), MIA (3.62), OAK (3.51) and DET (3.44) came in under four runs per game.

    I still think there is room to add one more lefty masher to the Corner/DH mix to round things out and trust Arnie to add one before spring training rolls around.

    Exactly. The Brewers almost always make a signing later in the offseason, when the market has died down and they're able to find better value (Grandal, Wong, JBJ, McCutchen, etc.). I see no reason to think this offseason will be any different. 

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    1 hour ago, Tim Muma said:

    Each person is completely entitled to their opinions and we can't prove that anyone is wrong or right here because we can't play out the season in different ways. So for the "let all the kids play" crowd, you are comfortable with the following lineup, when you're in a competitive window with one of the best rotations in baseball?

    1 - Yelich LF
    2 - Adames SS
    3 - Winker DH
    4 - Contreras C
    5 - Tellez 1B
    6 - Urias 3B/2B
    7 - Frelick RF
    8 - Mitchell CF
    9 - Turang 2B/3B

    And against LHP? Frelick, Mitchell, Turang, Yelich, Winker, Tellez all LH.  Taylor, Brosseau the only 2 right-handed options. Toro a switch-hitter. 

    I know many people think he will be gone but Keston Hiura is still on the roster. Until he isn't, you have to assume he will be on the team. (Yes I am aware he did not hit LHP well last year but his whole stat line was odd)

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    Tim Muma
  • Brewer Fanatic Contributor
  • Posted

    2 hours ago, sveumrules said:

    I added the Steamer projected wRC+ for 2023, that looks like more than four runs per game to me.

    Last year the Brewers 4.48 R/G ranked 10th vs a league average of 4.28 R/G. Only seven teams - KCR (3.95), LAA (3.85), WAS (3.72), PIT (3.65), MIA (3.62), OAK (3.51) and DET (3.44) came in under four runs per game.

    I still think there is room to add one more lefty masher to the Corner/DH mix to round things out and trust Arnie to add one before spring training rolls around.

    A few things here...

    1) I was being a bit hyperbolic in saying fewer than 4 runs per game, but I believe that regular lineup would be bottom third.

    2) I appreciate projections, that that is all they are. And especially for rookies/guys with 1 year experience, there's a fair amount of pure faith in non-MLB performance. I would be surprised if Mithell and Turang reached 99 wRC+ and 94 wRC+ respectively. And if you want to go with Steamer wRC+, Santander is 115 and Brandon Drury is 105. With a window to win now, I'd like those upgrades.

    3) I'd also warn about utilizing 1 or 2 stats to determine how well an offense works/fits as a whole. By some measures last season, the Brewers offense should have been seen as a reliable, dangerous group. However, they were wildly inconsistent and it felt like the "mix" of players didn't work for some reason. Hard to measure or evaluate, but I think there is something bigger to lineup construction.

    Again, not saying I am right or anyone is wrong, just my thoughts on the whole idea of adding to the position players.

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    3 hours ago, Tim Muma said:

    And against LHP? Frelick, Mitchell, Turang, Yelich, Winker, Tellez all LH.  

    Frelick & Turang have had pretty even splits through MiLB, Mitchell looks like the most likely platoon possibility of the three...

    Frelick 22 vs RHP: 396 PA | 890 OPS
    Frelick 22 vs LHP: 166 PA | 865 OPS

    Frelcik 21 vs RHP: 136 PA | 840 OPS
    Frelcik 21 vs LHP: 33 PA | 1054 OPS

    Turang 22 vs RHP: 399 PA | 767 OPS
    Turang 22 vs LHP: 204 PA | 781 OPS

    Turang 21 vs RHP: 368 PA | 711 OPS
    Turang 21 vs LHP: 128 PA | 705 OPS

    Mitchell 22 vs RHP: 268 PA | 832 OPS
    Mitchell 22 vs LHP: 89 PA | 766 OPS

    Mitchell 21 vs RHP: 205 PA | 817 OPS
    Mitchell 21 vs LHP: 63 PA | 732 OPS

    Yelich (401 PAs) and Winker (299 PAs) have each posted a 104 wRC+ vs LHP since 2020, so they aren't total zeroes against same hand pitching either.

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    The only way the Brewers sign an OF is if some player wasn't getting squat in salary offers, and we swoop in. But the guy would know he's just a placeholder for one of the rookies, so it would be a really desperate guy, possibly looking for a "prove me" season to get a good salary in 2024.
    I'm not convinced the Brewers won't go with Blake Perkins on the O.D. roster, keeping either Mitchell or Frelick in AAA until after they would disqualify for rookie status in 2024. I think they're that cheap.

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    5 hours ago, Brock Beauchamp said:

    Evaluators are often wrong but they're still more well-informed about prospects in the broadest sense of the term (as in all 30 teams) and they have no personal incentive to fudge the numbers one direction over the other (well, the good analysts, anyway).

    As for Law, he's one of the better analysts out there. I'd put his track record against almost anyone. He's overly opinionated and a bit of a jerk at times but he's also good at his job. When he speaks, I tend to listen because there's useful information in there.

    And anyway, I clearly said it was possible for the Brewers' rookies to all burst onto the scene but it's also unlikely and a pretty bad Plan A going into the season, in my opinion. That kind of decision is operating without a safety net.

    All media employed evaluators have a personal incentive.  It's called a job.  That is why the pundits focus on the big teams.  Most of their viewers are from those markets.  Also, the more controversial the pundit the more views his/her articles receive.  They are the most biased opinions out there and for good reason to think anybody in the media is virtuous writing without a personal incentive is plain naive.  

    Look at it this way.  The Milwaukee Brewer will spend about $120 million on a roster.  As of now the five players:  Mitchell, Taylor, Frelick, Yelich, and Winker contribute around $40 million.  That is not counting anything else.  The Brewers need to find another 20 players or so that will cost around $80 million.  Given Burnes, Woodruff, and Adames will likely net another $40 million that will leave $40-45 million for the other 15 players.  So, do you really think the Brewers ought to spend more money on outfield depth or should they field a complete team?

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    Just now, Hacksaw Jim Duggan said:

    The Milwaukee Brewer will spend about $120 million on a roster.  As of now the five players:  Mitchell, Taylor, Frelick, Yelich, and Winker contribute around $40 million.  That is not counting anything else.  The Brewers need to find another 20 players or so that will cost around $80 million.  Given Burnes, Woodruff, and Adames will likely net another $40 million that will leave $40-45 million for the other 15 players.  So, do you really think the Brewers ought to spend more money on outfield depth or should they field a complete team?

    I think paying a veteran outfielder makes them a more complete team. Your opinion may differ, that's fine.

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    If I recall correctly Law has an ivy league education and his writing style seems typical of a spoiled brat.  He gushed over high ceilings all the time and has no value for high floor guys.  This is exactly what the Brewers have at triple A.  Frelick, Mitchell, and Wiemer are all high floor.  None will be developing more power or speed or arm strength.  

    Have you ever noticed that high school players always have higher ceilings than college players?  Could that be because high school players haven't been evaluated as much as college players?  The pundits like high school players exactly for this reason they get to evaluate something new.  The new outfield will be an improvement over 2022 don't care what any pundit says my eyes don't lie.

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    Tim Muma
  • Brewer Fanatic Contributor
  • Posted

    1 hour ago, Hacksaw Jim Duggan said:

    All media employed evaluators have a personal incentive.  It's called a job.  That is why the pundits focus on the big teams.  Most of their viewers are from those markets.  Also, the more controversial the pundit the more views his/her articles receive.  They are the most biased opinions out there and for good reason to think anybody in the media is virtuous writing without a personal incentive is plain naive.  

    Look at it this way.  The Milwaukee Brewer will spend about $120 million on a roster.  As of now the five players:  Mitchell, Taylor, Frelick, Yelich, and Winker contribute around $40 million.  That is not counting anything else.  The Brewers need to find another 20 players or so that will cost around $80 million.  Given Burnes, Woodruff, and Adames will likely net another $40 million that will leave $40-45 million for the other 15 players.  So, do you really think the Brewers ought to spend more money on outfield depth or should they field a complete team?

    Roster resource has the Brewers' estimated 2023 payroll at $116 million right now with estimated arbitration figures. It lists the final 2022 payroll as $137 million. So if the Brewers just match last year, that is $21 million in space, some of which they'd save for trade deadline. 

    In reality, they should increase the payroll some with 1) $30 million from Disney money, 2) increased streaming revenue, 3) annual rising costs/prices of salries, and 4) the impact of the new CBA, which has been seen with free agent contracts.

    There is plenty of room if they choose to use it. They shouldn't spend just to spend, but the money is there for a couple solid additions.

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    1 hour ago, Hacksaw Jim Duggan said:

    All media employed evaluators have a personal incentive.  It's called a job.  That is why the pundits focus on the big teams.  Most of their viewers are from those markets.  Also, the more controversial the pundit the more views his/her articles receive.  They are the most biased opinions out there and for good reason to think anybody in the media is virtuous writing without a personal incentive is plain naive.  

    Look at it this way.  The Milwaukee Brewer will spend about $120 million on a roster.  As of now the five players:  Mitchell, Taylor, Frelick, Yelich, and Winker contribute around $40 million.  That is not counting anything else.  The Brewers need to find another 20 players or so that will cost around $80 million.  Given Burnes, Woodruff, and Adames will likely net another $40 million that will leave $40-45 million for the other 15 players.  So, do you really think the Brewers ought to spend more money on outfield depth or should they field a complete team?

    I am trying to understand your math. Mitchell/Taylor/Frelick are making the minimum (I think it's $711k) which equals $2.13M.  Winker is $8.25M and Yelich $22M. That's about $32.5M. The estimates that I have seen for Woody ($11.25)/Burnes ($12)/Adames ($9.25) equal about $32.5M also. On the high side that's $65M. That would leave (assuming $120M is the is correct) $55M for 18 players or about $3.1M per guy. I'm pretty sure Contreras is at the minimum and if Turang/Strzelecki/Cousins make the team (which looks highly probable) they are at the minimum too. I think there would still be room to add a reasonable 3B if one comes available and a little help in the pen. 

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    I’d kind of split the difference. Sign Myers or someone similar. If Mitchell and Frelick are playing well, he platoons with Tellez and Winker. If not, and Wiemer isn’t ready, he is a decent backup plan. I would start the two of them to start the season, though.

    I think there is a decent chance that Turang starts the season in AAA with Toro getting first crack at third. Assuming he is playing well, though, he would be my first call up from AAA.

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