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College- Going to Madison!


T B0NE 10
im currently a junior in high school....and im starting to have to think about what im gonna do after high school. i havent done anything yet as far as visiting campuses and stuff. but i dont think ill have problems getting into any 3.7 gpa 27 ACT. also i would like to try playing college baseball if possible. future plans, i dont really know id like to work in the government possibly or something like the cia or like that. i like history and stuff like that. or getting a dream job with the brew crew or packers would be sweet. so basically what should i do? what are some things to think about? and when should i start doing stuff?
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If I remember I think you can start applying to UW schools sometime in September. If there's any colleges you're currently thinking about but have never seen the campus, I'd encourage you to at least check them out and take the tour, unless there are any travel constraints or whatnot. Size and atmosphere of the campus are generally pretty big factors so it's always nice to see it up close.

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There are a lot of schools with or currently developing sports management and sports marketing degrees. You can usually find internships with minor league teams relatively easily to get in the door and often times those turn into real jobs after your degree. A cool thing about an internship with a minor league team is that their staffs are usually quite small so you get introduced to nearly every aspect of running the team (it's also usually a lot of hours). This is a good website to look at to get an idea of how the baseball job market works: http://www.pbeo.com/
You may run like Mays...
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Be sure to visit the schools that you're seriously considering. There are just some intangibles that one can only get from actually going there and taking a tour, sitting in on classes, talking with professors, etc.; the experience can often be enough to convince one that the school is an absolutely perfect fit, or to completely cross it off the list. I can't tell you how many people I've known who never set foot on their campus prior to move-in day, and it baffles me that someone would blindly commit that much money and the next four years of their life to somewhere they've never been to.
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Have you considered a two year junior college to start out and then transfer to a big school after two years? It seems to me that the first two years of college are mostly basic credit courses that transfer rather readily to the larger schools.

 

Maybe I'm wrong.

 

Anyhow, I played baseball at MATC-Madison for two years and all of my college credits transferred to UW-Whitewater, so I was on par with all of the other juniors the day I got there.

 

If you seriously want to play ball, try to take in a game and set up a meeting with the manager.

"His whole life is a fantasy camp. People should plunk down $2000 to live like him for a week. Sleep, do nothing, fall ass-backwards into money, mooch food off your neighbors and have sex without dating... THAT'S a fantasy camp."
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Have you considered a two year junior college to start out and then transfer to a big school after two years? It seems to me that the first two years of college are mostly basic credit courses that transfer rather readily to the larger schools.

 

Maybe I'm wrong.

 

Anyhow, I played baseball at MATC-Madison for two years and all of my college credits transferred to UW-Whitewater, so I was on par with all of the other juniors the day I got there.

 

If you seriously want to play ball, try to take in a game and set up a meeting with the manager.

As did I, minus the baseball playing. Worked well, and I was able to weasel my way into UW-Madison.

 

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I have to say that you need to get your behind in gear. I did all my college visits in the FALL of my junior year. I had my applications in by the fall of my senior year and had accepted everything by Winter of my Senior year. It seems to me like you might be a little behind the curve and really need to get serious, especially if you're looking to play a sport.

 

You need to honestly ask yourself if you're good enough to play somewhere. Presumably if you were more than above average, you'd have been recruited somewhere, so you need to be honest and figure out if this is really a possibility for you. You need to look at Junior Colleges and small schools. I played soccer at an NAIA school in the south and that really was because it was a small school and soccer was low on the totem pole. We didn't have scholarships. But if you're good and you are just looking to continue playing the game you love, you need to do some research. Schools aren't going to fall in your lap and coaches are going to want to see you play. They aren't going to wait until next summer's high school league to decide on you. That's WAY too late.

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I would recommend the JUCO route in order to get your prereqs out of the way. All of the tech schools in Wisconsin (MATC, Blackhawk etc.) have on ramp programs that guarantee you entrance into a 4 year school when you graduate after 2 years. Not only is this an easier path but it also is a lot cheaper.
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Have you considered a two year junior college to start out and then transfer to a big school after two years? It seems to me that the first two years of college are mostly basic credit courses that transfer rather readily to the larger schools.

 

It really depends for this. If you attend a two year university, but then you decide to transfer to a private college, things can get messy. Also, Madison doesn't have the same credit requirements as other universities, so even though the credits will transfer, they may not be enough. I took a Calculus course in high school that transferred to UW-Oshkosh and covered my math requirements for my degree, but my friends going to Madison were 1 credit short, even though all the credits transferred.

 

Also, this really depends on the program that you decide on. Many programs do all the general stuff in the first two years, followed by classes related to your degree. But there are also some programs that throw you right in. I started out in Music Education, and you're doing music from the first day, with sprinklings of general classes as you go along. But that was mostly because you can't just stop playing music for two years to take general classes.

 

Other than that, I definitely agree with b19...start visiting schools now. Most of them have visitation days where you can set it up and walk around campus with a guide. Also, if you know anyone that goes to certain schools, start asking them about it. Most people are somewhat knowledgeable about different degrees that their campus offers and how good their school is in those programs.

 

As for when to start doing stuff, start now. I would suggest Peterson's to give you a better idea about some schools and what they offer. You can enter in different degree programs and different areas of the country and see what results come back, then do a little more research on those schools. It's been a very valuable resource in my search for grad schools, and I imagine it would be just as valuable for undergrad.

 

One more thing, you said you got a 27 on your ACT and you're a junior? Take it again, and again even. Get the best score you can possibly get, and try to get scholarships with it.

If I had Braun's pee in my fridge I'd tell everybody.

~Nottso

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Ive noticed that one some of the sites for the UW schools they have a form to fill out if interested in playing athletics in those sports. I think Ill probably think of start filling those out. Thanks guys for the advice so far
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Major in the hardest program you can handle.

 

The road to mediocrity is already full.

Yeah, don't do something that you enjoy! Find something to do only because you can do it! http://forum.brewerfan.net/images/smilies/tongue.gif

 

I don't think you meant anything like this, but your post made me chuckle a bit when reading it. I'll say this, don't neglect a field that you might be interested in because you think it will be too difficult or demanding. College can get tough, but it isn't anything that no one has done before.

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Unless you are an engineer or something, major barely matters. One of the highest GPA's in my Poli Sci classes got a job as a computer programmer, his girlfriend said he had to take a 4 month training class because "he did not know a thing about it".
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I can attest to that. I got a promotion after I graduated simply because I had a degree, even though my degrees have absolutely nothing to do with my job. The business world especially is less to do with your degree and more to do with getting your foot in the door early.

If I had Braun's pee in my fridge I'd tell everybody.

~Nottso

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It really depends for this. If you attend a two year university, but then you decide to transfer to a private college, things can get messy. Also, Madison doesn't have the same credit requirements as other universities, so even though the credits will transfer, they may not be enough.

 

All I remember is that when I was at MATC, you were able to tell if a course transferred to the UW system by looking at the course number (a certain numerical combination=transfer credit). Back then (yeah, the dark ages), they were transferable to all UW schools, but I'm sure some of that has changed.

"His whole life is a fantasy camp. People should plunk down $2000 to live like him for a week. Sleep, do nothing, fall ass-backwards into money, mooch food off your neighbors and have sex without dating... THAT'S a fantasy camp."
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Unless it's changed since I was in school, which was all of a year ago, most credits will transfer to all UW schools except Madison. They have some kind of different rules for credits.

 

The example that I gave was because the Calculus class that I took was 4 credits, and the requirement for my degree and most degrees was either 3 or 4 credits...point being that the class fulfilled that requirement. For some reason, Madison required 5 credits to fulfill that requirement, so the class left the student 1 credit short. And normally you can't find a 1 credit class so it becomes a waste in some senses. So the credits transferred, but they were less useful at Madison than other UW system schools.

If I had Braun's pee in my fridge I'd tell everybody.

~Nottso

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Unless you are an engineer or something, major barely matters.
That is kinda my point. If the major doesn't matter - how much does the degree really matter?

 

I know plenty of individuals who are more intelligent than others with a degree. When in doubt, it is always better to be "certified" in something. (Engineer, Doctor, Lawyer, Teacher, Nurse, CPA etc.)

 

To me, a general education in business (ie Marketing) is a waste of money. You would learn more spending 4 years as an intern at a business. However, the rest of the world doesn't always see it that way.

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Also figure out what type of field you want to go into. A BA may be worthless to you. For example I do design, CAD, and estimating for a HVAC company and only have a 2 yr AS in design. I do have a BA from Whitewater that is pretty much worthless for me. Like others have said, unless it is a job specific degree most jobs look to see that you have some sort of degree rather then what it is in. An even larger factor is what knowledge and experience you have in said field. For example lets say you want to go into finance, work at a bank while going to school. The relevant exp. there will help you get a job. For me I worked as a carpenter and foremen for 8 years. Even though it has nothing to do with HVAC it still is construction and I am use familiar with how it works.
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First, you need to brush up on your writing skills. Regardless of what college you attend or career path you choose, success will be difficult in any field without strong writing and communcation skills. I realize this is just a message board, but GPA aside you're message screams 11 year old- not a Junior with solid grades. That's not meant to be an insult, just trying to help. Admissions offices would certainly have a huge problem if your cover letter was written in a similar style.

With that siad, I agree with others that you are already behind. It doesn't sound like you've done very much research on a career path. Have you looked to see what the CIA, Homeland Security, etc/ require? Have you talked to anyone there for guidance? Same goes for any occupation on your radar. You need to research what types of positions are available, how diffiuclt it is to find a job after college in that field, what the job is REALLY like, etc.

If you really don't know, or don't want to take the time to find out then I would suggest a two year UW school or similar. That will give you more time to figure out what you want to do, but in the process you won't break the bank and earn credits in the process.

On the other hand, if you can really zero in on what you want to do as a career- that will steer you to the appropriate college to give you the degree you need. Just don't make the mistake of choosing a career without learning a lot more about what it's all about.

Baseball shouldn't factor in to your decision. You have a couple years of ball versus your entire life afterwards. The right school with the right program is more important. There is alwats Land 'O lakes ball and other leagues around town to scratch your baseball itch.

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If you want to max out in life at $15.00/hour and 10 days of vacation a year, this is the attitude to have....

 

I never got a degree, and I doubt it has ever cost me anything. Some places, like Menards, won't hire management without a degree, so I never applied there.
However, you have to consider where you reasonably see yourself five or six years down the road. If you really want to work for the CIA or some similar government agency, you need to look at bigger schools that have a national presence. Otherwise, when you walk into interviews in larger cities where your resume says UWEC and the others say Northwestern, UW-Madison, Michigan you will quickly learn that having alumni status is often the first foot in the door. (BTW I am a UWEC alum).

 

Additionally, if you want to work for a professional sports team it helps to go to school in a city where one happens to be located, so you can make contacts that might lead you to a job down the road. Not many professional sports franchises would be looking to hire some hayseed from the boonies to do much more than get coffee or sweep out the men's room at night. They are going to hire individuals that someone they trust/respect can vouch for.

 

In any event, with your academic stats you should be able to get into some nice schools. I would make sure you go to the most elite school you can get into, then find a way to beg, borrow, or steal the money for tuition. Make absolutely sure to make connections with the faculty in your school of study, as well as with any alumni that may be in the position to help you in the future. That way when you graduate you won't have to scramble as hard as the others (like myself) who believed he was doing things the easy way at first, only to find out that it was actually the hard way.

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I recommend getting a degree that can apply to lots of different fields. A general liberal arts degree like history or english or a communications degree are good bases from which to go into a variety of industries. At that point you can specialize or go back to grad school and do something different. There are lots of people with MBAs that started out as nurses or project managers or teachers or whatever.

 

At the very least, find something you love and do that. Too many people chase money over enjoyment and end up hating what they do but a family or a mortgage or medical bills or whatever keeps them from really doing something fulfilling.

"Dustin Pedroia doesn't have the strength or bat speed to hit major-league pitching consistently, and he has no power......He probably has a future as a backup infielder if he can stop rolling over to third base and shortstop." Keith Law, 2006
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in regards to Masters, do not try for it until you are working in your field. Mainly for two reasons, one being that your employer may pay for it and two getting your Masters with out practical work experience will over and under qualify you jobs. You will over educated for entry level positions and under qualified experience wise for the position that the Masters would place you in.
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