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Rafael Soriano to WAS (2yrs/$28M)


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If I'm Drew Storen, I'm not thrilled about this. Storen had 43 saves in 2011. He get's injured in 2012 and they move him to a set up type role. Seems like they have to move one of those guys. Any one of them (especially Storen, Clippard, or Soriano) could be closers for another team. Are they planning on having 3 setup guys?

User in-game thread post in 1st inning of 3rd game of the 2022 season: "This team stinks"

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I doubt they'd sign a guy for $14MM/year and give up next year's first rounder only to trade someone away. I think they are going all-in this year and want to put as much talent on the field as possible. I don't necessarily like that strategy, but it's not uncommon for GMs to go overboard when they're shooting for a World Series.

 

Plus, it's not essential to have defined roles in the bullpen. It's pretty much set in stone that someone will have to be named "closer," but it's nice to have three really good players who on any day can pitch in high-leverage situations. In a one-run game where the starter only goes five innings, you can basically have a closer come in in the 6th, 7th, 8th and 9th. In other games, you can use the rested guy in the 8th, keeping the bullpen fresh, and if they have another injury like they had with Storen last year, they will be even better prepared.

 

It's not a luxury most teams have, and I agree with TLB that it's an overpay, but the Nationals are a better team now because of the pick-up. I don't want the Brewers doing something like this, but the Nationals are fighting with Atlanta as the team to beat in an otherwise weak NL East this year, and they could be the team to beat in the NL. We saw last year how a bullpen implosion can derail a team, and I doubt the Nationals will see that type of implosion with the talent they have in the 'pen.

 

I didn't realize this until I just looked, but the Nationals had the best run differential in baseball (+137) last year. Now they have Strasburg all season and their young guys have another year of "seasoning." They're certainly a strong contender for the NL crown.

"The most successful (people) know that performance over the long haul is what counts. If you can seize the day, great. But never forget that there are days yet to come."

 

~Bill Walsh

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I doubt they'd sign a guy for $14MM/year and give up next year's first rounder only to trade someone away.

 

Why not? It would seem to make perfect sense to me. You make up for losing a first rounder (and save some money - to help offset the $28M you just spent) by trading for a prospect or two. They probably view Soriano as more experienced and reliable than Storen and they may believe that they can get a better prospect (one that may be closer to MLB ready) by trading Storen (or Clippard) than what they would net with the 1st round pick they are giving up.

User in-game thread post in 1st inning of 3rd game of the 2022 season: "This team stinks"

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I wonder how much the deferred money improves the value of this deal. The number sounds insanely high but with the money spread out so far in the future maybe it isn't quite as bad as it looks. Only $7M each of the next 2 seasons gives them a lot of wiggle room.
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Wowsas! Didn't see that coming. Guess if you're going to lose your RPs you may as well replace them with one stud. Not in my philosophy of paying a RP big time contract money but now we get to see who's bullpen is better. Atlanta's or Washington's?

Storen was to be Atl's Kimbrel when he first came to the bigs.

 

I'm just floored at the money spent by Washington. Laroche,Werth,Soriano now. Maybe the added Bullpen depth with the upcoming deal away of Morse? That whole run differential is about to get tighter with Morse not in their lineup. Though I keep forgetting they got Span. Just a wonder who else does Washington get for Morse? They are really only lacking with Catcher for a bat. And they are loaded with SPs.

 

It has to be a helluva fun time being a Natinals fan currently.

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Even though the Nationals got a good relief pitcher, 28 million is too much to commit to one no matter how it's spread out. I'm of the philosophy that ball clubs need to look within their farm system for relief help (Axford, Henderson, and possibly Rogers this coming season some), or sign a cheap veteran on a 1 or 2-year deal, just like the Brewers did with Gonzalez and Gorzelanny. Hard throwers that can throw strikes only when the catcher calls for it. Bullpens in my opinion are supposed to be cheapest area of the roster. A team that goes young in the bullpen can be just as effective as a expensive veteran bullpen, and I wouldn't be surprised if the Brewers bullpen is right up there with the Nationals and Atlanta's in 2013.

 

I also wanted to note that the Brewers can get away with just having an average bullpen, because they have a top 3 offense in the NL that can make up for it.

Robin Yount - “But what I'd really like to tell you is I never dreamed of being in the Hall of Fame. Standing here with all these great players was beyond any of my dreams.”
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The Nationals have a lot of money to spend and Soriano has been one of the best relievers for a few years now. Is it a lot of money? Yes. Is it ridiculous for Washington to do this? Not so much.

 

Did they really need to commit 28 million to 1 reliever? I don't believe they did. Is it guaranteed to be a good move because Soriano is a very good reliever? no, because yes he could very well not live up to expectations and be anywhere near worth the money he's signed for. Then they could be talking about how they could have signed some other reliever for 5-10 million total that would have done a better job, which is very common, btw... Relievers have up and down years over their career all the time and it's just not a position ball clubs need to commit 28 million to for only 2 years of service. There is always better positions on the roster for that money. I don't care how much money a team has to spend there are smarter and better ways to run a ball club. I'm not trying to focus only on the Nationals here, but in general, it's not smart.

Robin Yount - “But what I'd really like to tell you is I never dreamed of being in the Hall of Fame. Standing here with all these great players was beyond any of my dreams.”
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There is always better positions on the roster for that money

 

Not really for that team. There aren't any good 2B candidates and they are set at every other position and in the rotation. This is just about the only place they could expect to add wins.

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Brewer Fanatic Contributor
Too much money, but it is only 2 years. And he has been really good the last few years. The team is built to win in that time frame. Yes, it's an overpay. But it's not for too many years and it helps solidify the bullpen, which they need help in. And they still can deal Morse for something of value. Even prospects if they desire.
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Too much money, but it is only 2 years. And he has been really good the last few years. The team is built to win in that time frame. Yes, it's an overpay. But it's not for too many years and it helps solidify the bullpen, which they need help in. And they still can deal Morse for something of value. Even prospects if they desire.

 

For teams like Nat's and Dodgers...the term "too much money" does not relate to them. They don't have a budget (well, at least in the same sense as the Crew). They have one thing on their minds. World Series. To them, over spending for an elite BP option is mute. They got their elite BP option and money is an afterthought.

 

For clubs like us, money is always on the forefront, but not for the Nat's and teams like them. Oh how nice it would be to have that mentality. As a fan, my wish for the best possible team to take me to the championship and how my team's owner spends their money is not a care to me. Just put the best players on the field to allow a chance of geting to the World Series/Championship and I'll be a happy fan.

 

Now, if I were employed by the organization, I may have a different philosophy, but as of now, I'm merely a fan and how my owner spends his money is besides the point to me...just give me a chance at the World Series...and that is EXACTLY what the owner of the Nat's is doing for their organization and their fanbase.

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Even though the Nationals got a good relief pitcher, 28 million is too much to commit to one no matter how it's spread out.

 

You can't just ignore how it is spread out just because you think it is too much. It is basic math/finance. Without more details, it could be most of the $14M is going to be paid 12 years from now. If you use the rate of inflation in baseball to figure it in todays dollars it is definitely much less than the Yankees QO cost per year. This looks to me like a way for Bores to save face as the dollar amount looks big enough, but the real cost is much lower.

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Even though the Nationals got a good relief pitcher, 28 million is too much to commit to one no matter how it's spread out.

 

You can't just ignore how it is spread out just because you think it is too much. It is basic math/finance. Without more details, it could be most of the $14M is going to be paid 12 years from now. If you use the rate of inflation in baseball to figure it in todays dollars it is definitely much less than the Yankees QO cost per year. This looks to me like a way for Bores to save face as the dollar amount looks big enough, but the real cost is much lower.

 

Actually, I can ignore how it's spread out, because it's still 28 million committed, so they have to pay it all. It's totally an overpay, and perhaps by 20+ million.

Robin Yount - “But what I'd really like to tell you is I never dreamed of being in the Hall of Fame. Standing here with all these great players was beyond any of my dreams.”
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For teams like Nat's and Dodgers...the term "too much money" does not relate to them. They don't have a budget (well, at least in the same sense as the Crew). They have one thing on their minds. World Series. To them, over spending for an elite BP option is mute. They got their elite BP option and money is an afterthought.

 

This would be a much more fitting complaint if the Nats were actually big spenders. They have built the team around cheap young talent and their payroll isn't really out of line with the Brewers. This isn't really about the market, this is about a team built from the ground up that has an average or better player at every position except part of the bullpen going for it before the cheap guys get too expensive. This deal puts $7M on the books for them this year. If the Brewers thought they were 1 player away from a serious world series run I'm sure they could find another $7M.

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Even though the Nationals got a good relief pitcher, 28 million is too much to commit to one no matter how it's spread out.

 

You can't just ignore how it is spread out just because you think it is too much. It is basic math/finance. Without more details, it could be most of the $14M is going to be paid 12 years from now. If you use the rate of inflation in baseball to figure it in todays dollars it is definitely much less than the Yankees QO cost per year. This looks to me like a way for Bores to save face as the dollar amount looks big enough, but the real cost is much lower.

 

Actually, I can ignore how it's spread out, because it's still 28 million committed, so they have to pay it all. It's totally an overpay, and perhaps by 20+ million.

 

He is essentially making $7M in 2013, $7M in 2014 and assuming the deferred $14M is paid out equally, he is getting approx $9M in 2014 dollars. So he is getting a total of $23M for the two years of work. If you think that is too much, fine I have no problem. But calling his contract $28M for the purposes of determining if too much was paid is just wrong.

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The problem I have with this is that the Nats already had Storen, Clippard, and Stamen. Is the bullpen really where they needed to spend this type of money and add strength? Was this really the piece of the puzzle that was needed for a "World Series run"?

User in-game thread post in 1st inning of 3rd game of the 2022 season: "This team stinks"

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Is the bullpen really where they needed to spend this type of money and add strength? Was this really the piece of the puzzle that was needed for a "World Series run"?

Considering how volatile relievers are from year to year, I would say yes.

Fan is short for fanatic.

I blame Wang.

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The problem I have with this is that the Nats already had Storen, Clippard, and Stamen. Is the bullpen really where they needed to spend this type of money and add strength? Was this really the piece of the puzzle that was needed for a "World Series run"?

 

Evidently they have money to burn, so are willing to spend millions for that next incremental win. I don't know their roster well enough to propose any other moves to make to spend their money that would buy more wins.

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The Nats only other real opening is at 2B and there aren't any good ones available. That roster is rock solid at every other position but the bullpen was a concern. Storen has a shady health history, Clippard doesn't really profile as a closer and Stammen has a career ERA over 4 and peripherals that didn't really give you confidence he can repeat last year.
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For teams like Nat's and Dodgers...the term "too much money" does not relate to them. They don't have a budget (well, at least in the same sense as the Crew). They have one thing on their minds. World Series. To them, over spending for an elite BP option is mute. They got their elite BP option and money is an afterthought.

 

This would be a much more fitting complaint if the Nats were actually big spenders. They have built the team around cheap young talent and their payroll isn't really out of line with the Brewers. This isn't really about the market, this is about a team built from the ground up that has an average or better player at every position except part of the bullpen going for it before the cheap guys get too expensive. This deal puts $7M on the books for them this year. If the Brewers thought they were 1 player away from a serious world series run I'm sure they could find another $7M.

 

I agree with everything you said, but also don't forget who owns the Nationals

 

http://assets.bizjournals.com/washington/news/Ted%20Lerner*280.jpg?v=1

 

The guy is worth between 3.5 and 4 billion dollars. He's 87 years old. Even if some want to argue that Soriano is being overpaid by a few million a year, Lerner can handle it financially just fine. Being 87 though and having a team with a legit shot to make the World Series next year, i can't fathom him fretting over Soriano's salary if in the playoffs Soriano is on the mound closing out tight games. Hell, Lerner could light two billion dollars on fire and still be filthy rich.

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